aristotle

Modes of Attraction: Part 3 - Logos

This is continuation of a three-part series discussing the three modes of attraction, playing off Aristotle’s Modes of Persuasion. Here, you’ll learn the different methods in which attraction is demonstrated.

Part 1: Ethos 
Part 2: Pathos 
Part 3: Logos

The logos mode of persuasion, as told by Aristotle, is logical appeal. The word logic is derived from it. Basically, this strategy is used to describe facts and theories that prove someone’s attraction. This kind of attraction actually improves your ethos because it positions the person as more attractive as a result of this new “knowledge.” This can come directly (from the person) or indirectly (from the person’s friend).

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Modes of Attraction: Part 2 - Pathos

This is continuation of a three-part series discussing the three modes of attraction, playing off Aristotle’s Modes of Persuasion. Here, you’ll learn the different methods in which attraction is demonstrated.

Part 1: Ethos
Part 2: Pathos
Part 3: Logos

From Aristotle, the pathos mode of persuasion is an appeal to the audience’s emotions. When you think about people like, Tony Robbins, Brendon Burchard, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, what these guys have in common is their ability to create a positive rapport to and engage a wide variety of people from all over the world. How they do this is by tapping into people’s emotions and creating a strong connection through mutual, relatable experiences. 

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Modes of Attraction: Part 1 - Ethos

Attraction is a sort of demonstrative emotion, since we are most fully attracted when we consider a thing to be attractive. Generally, there are three means of attraction. Attraction is achieved by a person’s personal character, when their actions make us believe that person is attractive. Secondly, attraction may come through stories, or simple voice cues that can stir emotion. Thirdly, attraction is effected though the words themselves when verbal persuasion can prove their attraction. Aristotle was big on interpreting the modes of persuasion; ethos, pathos and logos. In this three-part series, we will take a look at each one, giving examples in relation to the ability to demonstrate attraction.

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