The Ultimate Guide To Tying ANY Tie (Including Bow Ties)

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Chances are this guy didn't tie his own tie.It wasn't until I was in college when I learned how to tie a tie -- on my own.

I could blame my dad for that but he never wears a tie -- he's all about the collarless button-downs. Despite that, he still knows how to tie one.

I only know a handful of people who know how to tie a tie correctly -- and those who do only know one way and stick to it.

There are also those who rarely wear ties or if they do, tie once and leave it tied. And let's not talk about those who still use clip-ons.

None of this is wrong -- except for the clip-ons (Seriously, you should be ashamed. Don't be that lazy).

As men, we should learn not only how to tie a tie but also the various knots you can create. Here, I'll share the 4 most popular knots.

And even if you don't wear ties or have no value for this, you don't want to be the dad who can't teach his son how to tie a tie, do you?

Windsor

Windsor Knot - AM Style Bible

The classic, the Windsor is the most traditional knot and is the first one to master when you learn how to tie a tie; it creates a sizable, professional-looking knot -- meaning it works best for any occasion when you want to look completely respectable.

Windsor Knot - AM Style Bible

1. Place the tie around your shoulders, top-side up, with the fat end hanging roughly a foot lower than the skinny end.

2. Cross the fat portion over the skinny end to make an X fairly close to your neck.

Windsor Knot - AM Style Bible

3. Loop the fat end underneath the thin end and up through the neck loop. Drop it down so that it overlaps the thin end again.

Windsor Knot - AM Style Bible
Windsor Knot - AM Style Bible

4. Pull the fat end behind the bundle of cloth you've created to the left. Pull it up and drop it down through the neck loop again, then pull it to the left again.

5. Pull the fat end over from left to right, overlapping your evolving knot.

Windsor Knot - AM Style Bible

6. Pull the fat end up through the loop again, behind what now looks like a nearly complete knot.

7. Bring the fat end back down and insert it through the knot.

Windsor Knot - AM Style Bible
Windsor Knot - AM Style Bible

8. Finish your knot by tightening it. In doing so, you will see the beginnings of a natural dimple form. Mess with the dimple to make it as distinct as possible. Its dual purpose is to add depth to an otherwise boring shape of a tie, and make you look stylish.

As a general rule, never leave the house without a dimple in your tie.

Half-Windsor - Credit: AM Style Bible

Half-Windsor

Like the Windsor, the Half-Windsor has professional reputation; however, it’s not bulky, which makes it a better option for narrower collars and softer shirts.

1. Place the tie around your shoulders, top-side up, with the fat end hanging roughly a foot lower than the skinny end.

Half-Windsor - Credit: AM Style Bible
Half-Windsor - Credit: AM Style Bible

2. Cross the fat portion over the skinny end to make an X fairly close to your neck.

3. Pull the fat end behind the thin end to the right, then up in front of it and down through the neck loop.

Half-Windsor - Credit: AM Style Bible
Half-Windsor - Credit: AM Style Bible

4. Pull the fat end over from right to left, overlapping your evolving knot.

5. Pull the fat end up through the loop again, behind what now looks like a nearly complete knot.

Half-Windsor - Credit: AM Style Bible

6. Bring the fat end back down and insert it through the knot.

7. Finish your knot by tightening it; again, accentuate that dimple.

Four-in-Hand

Looking for a knot that take little time? The Four-in-Hand is your guy. It’s an knot you can tie on-the-go that works with both casual looks and narrow collars.

Four-in-Hand - Credit: AM Style Bible

1. Place the tie around your shoulders, top-side up, with the fat end hanging roughly a foot lower than the skinny end.

Four-in-Hand - Credit: AM Style Bible

2. Cross the fat portion over the skinny end to make an X fairly close to your neck.

Four-in-Hand - Credit: AM Style Bible
Four-in-Hand - Credit: AM Style Bible

3. Wrap the fat end around the thin end, then up through the neck loop. Drop the fat end back down and through the knot.

4. Finish your knot by tightening it. Note that the dimple is much harder to produce on this kind of knot. Just do your best.

Pratt

Pratt - Credit: AM Style Bible

The Pratt is what most guys will stick to. Its symmetrical look and less complicated construction make it the most universal knot that goes with any dress shirt.

1. Place the tie around your neck upside down (with the seams facing outward). Note that the fat end should be hanging lower than the thin end.

Pratt - Credit: AM Style Bible

2. Cross the two ends over to form an X and flip the fat end up and through the loop to form a knot around the smaller end.

Pratt - Credit: AM Style Bible

3. Pull both ends apart quite tightly to ensure your knot is snug, then bring the fat end of the tie over the thin end to cover your first knot.

Pratt - Credit: AM Style Bible
Pratt - Credit: AM Style Bible
Pratt - Credit: AM Style Bible

4. Pull the fat end up and through the loop, then drop it down through the knot.

5. Tighten and dimple up.

Now, let's talk about the bow tie. The bow tie is quickly becoming a staple in most people's fashion style. Granted, it's not for everyone but pulled off correctly, you'll stand out in a way many men can't.

1. Drape the bow tie around your neck, under your collar and hold on the ends. The end on your right should about an inch and a half lower than the one on your left.

2. Cross the longer end over the shorter one. Cross the tie near your neck so the loop around your neck is just large enough to work with. You don’t want your bow hanging in front of your chest.

3. Pass the longer end up through the loop, making a simple, loose knot.

4. Take the loose end that’s not on your right and fold the end back to make a loop that’s pinched between your thumb and index finger. What happens is your double the right side of the tie over itself to make the loop. Be sure to hold this loop because this will be the front loop of the finished tie.

5. Drop the left end of the tie over the front of the bow.

6. Make a new loop with the left end, just like you did with the first one. While still holding the loop you just made, double the end over itself, like last time.

7. Put the new loop behind the front loop facing the opposite direction. Pinch the loops together with your thumb and push the second loop into the knot behind the front one. The tip of your right index finger will be in position to push the end of the loop into the hole behind the front one.

So one one side, the loop with be on the front and on the other, in the back.

8. Tighten the knot by pulling the two loops together and finally straighten the bow tie.

To take the bow tie off, just pull on one of the tails.

Here is a video that demonstrates these steps:

Special thanks to AskMen & wikiHow for the images.

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